Soy is a Condiment in Japan NOT a Meat Replacement

Soy is regarded as the ‘vegetarians answer’ to a diet lacking muscle-building protein, and often touted as the cholesterol lowering replacement for the supposed artery-clogging and cancer-causing features of red meat. Not only have we been misled into believing that animal protein and saturated fat are bad, but we’ve been creatively brainwashed into thinking plant proteins, like soy, are the solution.

Many are surprised to learn that the soybean itself is toxic to humans. As outlined in Kaayla Daniels highly recommended book, The Whole Soy Story, she outlines why a safe daily intake of soy is less than 36g per day.

Any guesses how many grams of soy are in a block of tofu?

250g!

Maybe this is why a study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found cognitive dysfunction and brain atrophy in men consuming 2 or more servings of tofu per week.

The main argument for consuming soy usually stems from this flawed statement:

“The Japanese eat lots of soy and have a lower incidence of heart disease.”

Reality – The Japanese eat very little soy. They treat it as a condiment.

A 1998 study in Takayama City, Japan, reviewed soy consumption from 1242 men and 3596 women, and determined that the daily intake averaged 3-13g/day for men, and 3-11g/day for women (well below 36g/day).  Likewise, the average soy consumption in China in the 1930’s was 1.5% of total calories.  Any guesses what was 65% of total calories…?

…Pork!

If mirroring Asian dietary habits is your strategy for living longer and healthier, I suggest taking a closer look at the facts. Sadly, most of the information we hear about soy is from companies marketing soy, and/or the governments controlled by them. Soy is toxic to humans and livestock, is one of the most heavily sprayed crops, and close to 93% of it Genetically Modified (GMO).  It should never be treated as a meat or milk replacement, and selling it as an infant formula should be illegal. The only safe way to consume soy, is in small amounts and fermented…

…like they do in Japan and China.

Stay Lean!
Coach Mike